The Johns Hopkins Research Symposium on

Engineering in Healthcare

"Engineering for an Aging Society"

ABOUT THE SYMPOSIUM

The annual Johns Hopkins Research Symposium on Engineering in Healthcare brings together experts who advocate for leveraging new and emerging technologies to deliver better health care. We invite all Johns Hopkins faculty, researchers, students, staff and clinicians, as well as industry representatives, to join us at the symposium this fall.

 

A special thanks to the Swirnow Family for their generous support of this event 

 


 

“Engineering for an Aging Society”

 

The diverse and complex challenges and opportunities facing an aging population will grow substantially over the coming decades. Today, about one in every eight, or 13.1%, of the US population is an older adult (65+) . This population will nearly double to an estimated 88.5 million – over 20% of the population – by 2050.

Older adults prefer to “age-in-place” and remain in their own homes for as long as they are able. Physical, mental, and emotional health are key elements for maintaining quality of life and independence.

This year’s symposium will explore the challenges and opportunities faced by aging adults and their care networks as they seek to live independently while maintaining their physical, mental, and emotional health. The goal is to jumpstart a conversation to identify areas where systematic deployment of appropriately designed and targeted technologies that augment social, cognitive, and physical activities can “shift the curve” of age-related decline of life quality, support wellness, and reduce reliance on external support for older adults.

 

2018 Organizing Committee

 

Greg Hager
Director, Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare and Mandell Bellmore Professor of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University

Sarah L. Szanton
Endowed Professor for Health Equity and Social Justice and Director of the Center for Innovative Care in Aging, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

Wendy Rogers
Shahid and Ann Carlson Khan Professor of Applied Health Sciences, Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Elizabeth Mynatt
Distinguished Professor and Executive Director Institute for People and Technology (IPaT), Georgia Tech University 

 

Download the full 2018 Program 

 

Schedule & Speakers

Registration is closed!



PHOTOS & VIDEOS

 

  • Greg Hager, Sarah Szanton, and Dean Ed Schlesinger

 

 

Watch the 2018 Symposium:

 

November 19, 2018

Chevy Chase Auditorium

Johns Hopkins Medical Campus
Baltimore, MD

Schedule & Speakers

Presenters

Majd Alwan

Majd Alwan

Senior Vice President of Technology and Executive Director of the LeadingAge Center for Aging Services Technologies (CAST)

Majd Alwan, Ph.D., a noted researcher and authority on aging-services technologies, is LeadingAge’s senior vice president of technology, and executive director of the LeadingAge Center for Aging Services Technologies (CAST).

Dr. Alwan is responsible for creating and leading a network of technology companies, providers and research institutions focused on technology solutions for an aging society. The network advances the interests of older consumers, caregivers and providers and fosters opportunities for collaboration between provider organizations, technology companies, and research institutions in exploring product development, testing prototypes, evaluating technology and deploying technology-enabled care models.

Prior to joining CAST, Majd served as an Assistant Professor and the Director of the Robotics and Eldercare Technologies Program at the University of Virginia’s Medical Automation Research Center. His research interests there included passive functional and health assessment, biomedical instrumentation, medical automation, as well as eldercare and assistive technologies.

As a volunteer, Dr. Alwan chaired the Funding Aging Services Technologies committee and the Pilots committee for CAST. He is a Senior Member of the IEEE’s Engineering in Medicine and Biology, and Robotics and Automation Societies, and a member of IEEE-USA’s Medical Technology Policy Committee and the Geriatric Care Workgroup. Alwan also serves on the Alzheimer’s Association’s Work Group on Technology.

Dr. Alwan received his Ph.D. in intelligent robotics from Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of London, a Master’s of Science degree in control engineering with distinction from Bradford University, and a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Damascus University.

 

” Technology & Aging Services: Priorities, Challenges & Recommendations 

Amy Eisenstein

Amy Eisenstein

Director of Research and Continuous Quality Improvement, CJE SeniorLife, Chicago; Adjunct Assistant Professor, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University

Dr. Eisenstein is the Director of Research and Continuous Quality Improvement at CJE SeniorLife in Chicago. She is also Adjunct Assistant Professor at Northwestern University in the Feinberg School of Medicine.  Dr. Eisenstein’s research interests include issues related to aging, health, and disease with a focus on measuring patient reported outcomes associated with long term care and community-based living. In her current role, she splits her time between conducting internal continuous quality improvement and evaluation with the 14 departments across her organization, and in conducting external research on aging.

“Using Technology to Engage Older Adults in Research”

In 2016 CJE SeniorLife, an eldercare services organization in Chicago, received an engagement award to create a research advisory board of older adults living in a long term care setting and receiving long term supports and services (LTSS) at home. While the nursing home residents could easily meet in the building, it became apparent that the frail elders aging in place would require a different approach. The organization partnered with the SelfHelp Home’s Virtual Senior Center, or VSC, to reach this population in an effective and approachable manner. The VSC has a user-friendly interface and the ability to video chat with a group. The VSC “Bureau of Sages,” as the group was called, allowed the older adults living at home to build community at the biweekly meetings while learning about research topics, advising researchers on their work, and formulating a research project of their own.

 

 

Ayse P. Gurses

Ayse P. Gurses

Associate Professor, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine

Director, Center for Health Care Human Factors, Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality

Research Interests

Human Factors Engineering, Cognitive Engineering, User-centered Design, Patient Safety, Sociotechnical Systems Approach to Technology Design and Implementation, Care Coordination

Ayse P. Gurses, PhD, MS, MPH is an associate professor in the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality and the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. She is the founding Director of the Center for Health Care Human Factors in the Johns Hopkins Medicine. She has joint appointments in the Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Whiting School of Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. Ayse is passionate about three critical and related public health topics: patient safety, health IT design and implementation, and occupational health and safety of healthcare workers. Formally trained in industrial and systems engineering and public health, she uses a combination of engineering and public health methodologies in her work. Ayse has been a principal or co-principal investigator on several federally funded research grants and contracts, totaling over $7M. Her current research efforts focus on improving patient-centered care and medication safety among elderly, health information technology design and implementation, improving coordination and teamwork in pediatric trauma, patient safety in the cardiac operating room, improving safety of transitions of care, increasing compliance with evidence-based guidelines to reduce infections, and clinician working conditions.

Ayse is the author of 50 peer-reviewed articles and 10 book chapters, and gave over 65 invited talks. She serves as the Scientific Editor of Applied Ergonomics, a top-level journal in the field of human factors engineering. She is also the Editor for the Sociotechnical Systems Analysis Department of the IIE Transactions in Healthcare Systems Engineering.

Ayse is the recipient of multiple awards including the Liberty Mutual Award for the Best Paper in the journal ‘Ergonomics,’ the International Ergonomics Association/ Liberty Mutual Best Paper Award in Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison Forward under 40 award. Nominated by the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, Ayse is also a recipient of an Early Career Impact Award from the Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences (FABBS).

” Reengineering Work Systems to Improve Care Coordination and Care Transitions for Older Adults 

Aging population and increasing inpatient care costs, coupled with advances in engineering and technology, require improved understanding of where a majority of the ambulatory care activities occur: within the patient work system and between the patient and professional work systems (i.e., in the patient’s interaction with health professionals). The variability and unsatisfactory results in outcomes of transitional care programs are indications that our knowledge of care transitions and care coordination is insufficient and excludes potentially effective intervention strategies. In this presentation, we will describe how human factors and systems engineering approaches can contribute to (1) the understanding of underlying hazards and mitigating strategies in care transitions of older adults from a patient-centered perspective and; (2) the development of effective and innovative work system redesign efforts.

Gregory D. Hager

room:Malone Hall 340

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Director

Gregory D. Hager

Director, Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare

Mandell Bellmore Professor of Computer Science

Research Interests

Computer Vision, Robotics, Medical Robotics, Human-Machine Systems

Gregory D. Hager is the Mandell Bellmore Professor of Computer Science at Johns Hopkins University and Founding Director of the Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare. Professor Hager received his BA in Mathematics and Computer Science Summa Cum Laude at Luther College (1983), and his MS (1986) and PhD (1988) from the University of Pennsylvania. He was a Fulbright Fellow at the University of Karlsruhe, and was on the faculty of Yale University prior to joining Johns Hopkins. Professor Hager’s research interests include collaborative and vision-based robotics, time-series analysis of image data, and medical applications of image analysis and robotics. He is also the former Chair of the Computing Community Consortium, a board member of the Computing Research Association, and is a member of the governing board of the International Federation of Robotics Research. Professor Hager has served on the editorial boards of IEEE TRO, IEEE PAMI, and IJCV. He is a fellow of the IEEE for his contributions to Vision-Based Robotics and a Fellow of the MICCAI Society for his contributions to imaging and his work on the analysis of surgical technical skill.

Secondary Appointments: Mechanical Engineering, Electrical & Computer Engineering

Kenneth Hepburn

Kenneth Hepburn

Professor, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University

Ken Hepburn is a gerontologist.  He is currently a professor in Emory University’s Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing and is one of the directors of Emory’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center.  For the past 35 years, he has worked with colleagues across the disciplines to develop and test programs and materials designed to strengthen the capacity of individuals to care for family members and friends who are living with Alzheimer’s disease or similar progressive neurocognitive illnesses.  The Savvy Caregiver is the most widely disseminated of the psychoeducation programs he has helped to develop, and he is currently leading a National Institute on Aging-sponsored trial of “Tele-Savvy,” a fully on-line version of Savvy that allows caregivers to take part in group videoconferences and to view video lessons designed to help them acquire the knowledge, skills, and outlook that will enhance their caregiving mastery, promote the quality of life of the persons for whom they provide care, and reduce the often adverse effects that caregiving has on caregivers.

” Engineering to Address the Needs, Challenges, and Opportunities for Informal Caregivers of Persons Living with Neurocognitive Illnesses 

Informal dementia caregivers face a daily challenge of guiding an individual living with Alzheimer’s disease or similar progressive illnesses through days that are as safe, calm, and pleasant as possible.  This brief talk posits the value of an engineering contribution that would provide the caregiver with detailed guidance in the selection of tasks and activities in which the individual could become contentedly involved throughout the day.  This engineering contribution would conduct assessments of cognition, performance, and physiological capacity to provide a tailored menu of a day’s activities and also provide a rapidly configured “plan B” should events conspire against the first plan.

 

 

T. (Kesh) Kesavadas

T. (Kesh) Kesavadas

Director, Health Care Engineering Systems Center; Professor of Industrial and Enterprise Systems Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Dr. Kesavadas is the Founder Director of Health Care Engineering Systems Center at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Before coming to Illinois, Kesavadas was a professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University at Buffalo (NY), where he founded the University at Buffalo Virtual Reality Laboratory. He received his doctoral degree from the Pennsylvania State University in 1995. Kesavadas has been in the forefront of Virtual Reality and its application to medicine since 1993, when this field was still in its infancy.

In 2004, Dr. Kesavadas was honored as the “Inventor of the Year” Western New York. He has also won numerous awards including SUNY Chancellor’s award for Innovation in 2004 and UB Visionary of the year award in 2010. He developed the world’s first stand-alone virtual reality Robotic Surgical Simulator RoSS and also co-founded two start-up companies including Surgical Simulation System LLC, a company that commercialized RoSS. His own research interests are in the areas of medical robotics and simulation, virtual reality in design, haptics and human-computer interaction. Kesavadas is a Fellow of American Society of Mechanical Engineering and a member of IEEE.

He serves as the “Engineer-in-Chief” of the Jump ARCHES collaborative partnership between the College of Engineering at Illinois and healthcare providers at OSF HealthCare and at the University of Illinois’ College of Medicine at Peoria. Kesavadas is member of the inaugural faculty of the Carle-Illinois College of Medicine and is the Co-Director of the new Jump Simulation Center at UIUC.

” Creating Smart Connected Communities – Challenges and Rewards 

Daniel Morrow

Daniel Morrow

Chair, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Dan Morrow is professor and chair of the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, with appointments in the Beckman Institute, the Carle-Illinois College of Medicine, Illinois Informatics Institute, and the Departments of Psychology and Industrial & Enterprise Systems Engineering. He received a PhD in cognitive psychology from the University of California Berkeley. His research on the impact of aging on cognition, communication and decision making in the health care and aviation domains has been funded by NIH and NASA-Ames. He is current editor of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, past president of American Psychological Association Division 21 (Applied Experimental and Engineering Psychology), and fellow of APA and the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

” Health Literacy and Technology Design for Older Adult Self-care 

An interdisciplinary approach to designing technology support for older adults’ self-care will be described. Central to the framework is the concept of health literacy, analyzed as a multi-faceted patient resource for self-care that depends on the interplay of broader cognitive resources that tend to decline with age (processing capacity) and resources that may increase (general and domain-specific knowledge; emotional self-regulation). Within this framework, technology can be viewed as environmental support that reduces demands on age-vulnerable resources (processing capacity) and leverages older adults’ strengths (e.g., knowledge) to support comprehension and use of information needed for self-care tasks such as taking medication. The approach is illustrated by recent work on using computer agents for patient education in portals to Electronic Health Records and in other digital environments.

Elizabeth Mynatt

Elizabeth Mynatt

Distinguished Professor and Executive Director, Institute for People and Technology, Georgia Tech University 

Dr. Elizabeth Mynatt is a Distinguished Professor in the College of Computing and the Executive Director of Georgia Tech’s Institute for People and Technology that spans the multidisciplinary breadth of Georgia Tech while pursuing innovative research to promote healthy, productive and fulfilling lives on a global scale. Mynatt serves as members of the National Academies Computer Science and Telecommunications Board and the NSF CISE Advisory Board.

In her research, Mynatt investigates the design and evaluation of health information technologies including creating personalized mobile technology for supporting breast cancer patients during their cancer. She is also one of the principal researchers in the Aware Home Research Initiative; investigating the design of future home technologies, especially those that enable older adults to continue living independently as opposed to moving to an institutional care setting.

Mynatt has graduated 15 Ph.D. students and their career paths range from academic positions at Columbia University, University of Colorado, Harvard University, Indiana University, Oregon Health and Science University, and the University of Zurich, researchers at Google, and startup entrepreneurs. She has been recognized as an ACM Fellow, a member of the SIGCHI Academy, and a Sloan and Kavli research fellow.

Katherine Ornstein

Katherine Ornstein

Director of Research for Institute for Care Innovations at Home and Assistant Professor, Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Katherine Ornstein, PhD, MPH, is an epidemiologist and Assistant Professor in the Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine and the Institute for Translational Epidemiology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. She serves as the Director of Research for Mount Sinai School of Medicine’s Institute for Care Innovations at Home.  Her research, funded by the National Institute on Aging and the National Palliative Care Research Center, focuses on caregiving over the course of serious illness through the end of life, the epidemiology of the homebound population, and home-based primary and palliative care.

Reframing healthcare beyond the individual: A focus on home-based care delivery “

While evidence suggests that caregiving and bereavement impacts the health of caregivers, we know less about the impact of healthcare treatment on family caregivers’ health, healthcare choices and spending. Current healthcare cost estimates do not consider potential downstream costs associated with the healthcare expenditures of family caregivers. This presentation will discuss research on the effects of treatment intensity over the course of serious illness and at the end of life on families with special emphasis on the homebound and home-based care delivery.

 

Michael Phillips

Michael Phillips

Director of Technology Strategy Integration, AARP 

Michael Phillips is the Director of Technology Strategy Integration at AARP and is dedicated to supporting AARP’s important social mission through technology.  Michael has led internal and external technology initiatives at AARP for over 15 years, including technology industry partnerships, community programs, IT strategy, and championing innovation. Prior to AARP, Michael managed large-scale telephony projects for France Telecom and SATO Travel. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Mass Communication from Auburn University and Change Leadership Certification from Cornell University. He is passionate about empowering adults with the technology insights they need to take full advantage of these amazing times and advocating for all generations within the technology industry.

” The Future of Technology within an Aging Population 

The implications of exponential technology growth are enormous, on our health, mobility, passions, and even the length of our lives.  The collision of several technologies, powered by exponential trends can disrupt the challenges facing aging adults. Innovators can now draw from emerging technologies like artificial intelligence, biometric sensors, blockchain, embedded voice, process automation and virtual reality to solve problems. In line with our social mission, AARP is disrupting the conversation around aging to bring technology-enabled innovation to market. Innovators and policy makers must collaborate and address those factors that lead to a “digital divide” of tech haves and have-nots, such as cost, complexity, awareness, isolation, dialect, and distrust. Emerging technologies that are human and humane come with the promise to help augment the way we function and make us healthier, faster, sharper, mobile, and empowered to choose how we live as we age.

 

 

Wendy Rogers

Wendy Rogers

Shahid and Ann Carlson Khan Professor of Applied Health Sciences, Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Wendy A. Rogers, Ph.D., is a Shahid and Ann Carlson Khan Professor of Applied Health Sciences in the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.  She is Director of the Health Technology Graduate & Continuing Education Program; Program Director of CHART: Collaborations in Health, Aging, Research, and Technology; and Director of the Human Factors and Aging Laboratory.  Her research interests include design for aging; technology acceptance; human-automation interaction; aging-in-place; human-robot interaction; and aging with disabilities.  She is funded by the National Institute on Aging as part of the Center for Research and Education on Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE); and the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research as part of the RERC on Technologies to Support Aging-in-Place for People with Long-Term Disabilities (TechSAge).

Sarah L. Szanton

Sarah L. Szanton

Health Equity and Social Justice Endowed Professor and Director of the Center for Innovative Care in Aging, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

Sarah Szanton, PhD, ANP, FAAN is the Health Equity and Social Justice Endowed Professor and Director of the Center for Innovative Care in Aging at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, where she oversees and leads the Center’s efforts in advancing and supporting the well-being of older adults and their families using novel and innovative approaches, policies, and practices. She holds a joint appointment in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

She tests interventions to reduce health disparities among older adults. Her work particularly focuses on ways to help older adults “age in place” as they grow older. Through her Community Aging in Place—Advancing Better Living for Elders (CAPABLE) program, which combines home visits from a nurse, occupational therapist, and handyman, Szanton helps equip low-income older adults to live more comfortably and safely in their homes. The program has helped decrease disability, depression, and improve self care for participants and has expanded to thirteen cities in eight States. With her background in policy, Szanton uses her research to inform policymakers to alternative, cost-effective solutions to save taxpayer dollars while strengthening the health and well-being of older adults. In addition, she is piloting strategies for preventing falls among older adults and studying how food and energy access impact health outcomes.

Szanton has received the Edgerunner Award from the American Academy of Nursing, the Protégé Award from the Friends of the National Institute of Nursing Research, the Baltimore Business Journal Health Care Innovator award. In 2016, she was named to the PBS Organization’s “Next Avenue 2016 Influences in Aging” a list of thought-leaders who are changing how we age and think about aging in America. Her work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Innovation Center, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the John A. Hartford Foundation, the Rita and Alex Hillman Foundation, and the AARP Foundation.

Szanton completed undergraduate work in African-American Studies at Harvard University and earned a bachelor’s degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. She holds a nurse practitioner master’s degree from the University of Maryland and a doctorate from Johns Hopkins University.

 

Jennifer Wolff

Jennifer Wolff

Eugene and Mildred Lipitz Professor, Department of Health Policy and Management; Director, Roger C. Lipitz Center for Integrated Health Care, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Jennifer Wolff is the Eugene and Mildred Lipitz Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management and Director of the Roger C. Lipitz Center for Integrated Health Care at the Bloomberg School of Public Health and holds a joint appointment in the Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  Dr. Wolff’s research focuses on the care of older persons with complex health needs and disabilities and on applied studies and initiatives directed at better supporting family caregivers within systems of care.  Her research has been continuously funded by the National Institute of Health and other federal agencies and private foundations.  Dr. Wolff is a member of AcademyHealth, the American Society on Aging, and the Gerontological Society of America and has served on several consensus committees convened by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

” Supporting the Family Caregiver“Workforce

This session will discuss challenges and opportunities of engaging family caregivers of older adults in care delivery.

Programs

  • Registration & Breakfast

  • Welcoming Remarks

    T.E SCHLESINGER

    Benjamin T. Rome Dean, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University

    GREGORY D. HAGER

    Mandell Bellmore Professor of Computer Science, Director of The Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare, Johns Hopkins University

  • Keynote

    DR. SARAH SZANTON

    Health Equity and Social Justice Endowed Professor and Director of the Center for Innovative Care in Aging, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

  • Panel One: Older Adults

    Moderator

    SARAH J. SZANTON

    Health Equity and Social Justice Endowed Professor and Director of the Center for Innovative Care in Aging, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

    Panelists

    AMY EISENSTEIN

    Director of the Leonard Schanfield Research Institute at CJE SeniorLife, Chicago; Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Medical Social Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University

    DANIEL G. MORROW

    Chair, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

    MICHAEL PHILLIPS

    Director of Technology Strategy Integration, AARP

  • Break

  • Panel Two: Care Partners

    Moderator

    ELIZABETH MYNATT

    Executive Director of the Institute for People and Technology, Georgia Tech University

    Panelists

    JENNIFER WOLFF

    Eugene and Mildred Lipitz Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

    KENNETH HEPBURN

    Professor, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University

    KATHERINE ORNSTEIN

    Director of Research for the Institute for Care Innovations at Home and Assistant Professor, Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

  • Lunch and Focus Areas Directed Discussions

  • Afternoon Discussion: Introduction & Focus

    WENDY ROGERS

    Khan Professor of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  • Panel Three: Systems Level

    Moderator

    WENDY ROGERS

    Khan Professor of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

    Panelists

    MAJD ALWAN

    Senior Vice President of Technology and Executive Director, LeadingAge Center for Aging Services Technologies (CAST)

    THENKURUSSI KESAVADAS

    Director, Health Care Engineering Systems Center, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

    AYSE GURSES

    Director, Armstrong Institute Center for Health Care Human Factors, Johns Hopkins Medicine

  • Lunch Discussion: Report-outs

  • Research Spotlights

    RAMAVARAPU "RS" SREENIVAS

    University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

    ABIGAIL WOOLRIDGE

    University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

    JON A. SANFORD

    Georgia Tech University

    ELIZABETH MYNATT

    Georgia Tech University

    GEORGE REBOK

    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

    MICHELLE CARLSON

    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

  • Closing Remarks

    GREGORY D. HAGER

    Mandell Bellmore Professor of Computer Science, Director of The Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare, Johns Hopkins University

  • Poster Session & Cocktails

    Arcade Room, Chevy Chase Auditorium

Poster Presentations

A Generative-Discriminative Basis Learning Framework to Predict Clinical Severity from Resting State Functional MRI Data

Presenter: Niharika Shimona D'Souza | Neural Systems Analysis Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University

Predictive Analytics for Patient Mobility Using AM-PAC

Presenter: Michael Crockett, Cong Mu, Anton T. Dahbura Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University

Designing and Developing Companion Robots for Use in Health Care

Presenter: Amrita Krishnaraj | Intuitive Computing Lab, Johns Hopkins University

Bimanual Wrist-Squeezing Haptic Feedback Changes Speed-Force Tradeoff in Robotic Surgery Training

Presenter: Sergio Machaca | Haptics and Medical Robotics Laboratory (HAMR), Johns Hopkins University

A Modified K-Means Algorithm for Resting State Fmri Analysis of Brain Tumor Patients, as Validated by Language Localization

Presenter: Naresh Nandakumar | Neural Systems Analysis Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University

Targeted Real-Time Early Warning System (TREWScore) Sepsis

Presenter: Vi Nguyentran & Karen D’Souza | Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

Towards an Understanding of the Role Operator Limb Dynamics Plays in Haptic Perception of Stiffness

Presenter: Mohit Singhala | Haptics and Medical Robotics Laboratory (HAMR), Johns Hopkins University

Endoscopic Navigation in the Absence of CT Imaging

Presenter: Ayushi Sinha | Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare, Johns Hopkins University

The Johns Hopkins Myocardial infarction, COmbined-device, Recovery Enhancement (MiCORE) Study: Readmission Rates and Cost-Savings of the Corrie Health Digital Platform for Post-Myocardial Infarction Patients

Presenter: Erin M. Spaulding | Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

Leveraging Mobile Health to Assess Intensity of Physical Activity and Urge to Smoke: A Secondary Analysis of mActive-Smoke

Presenter: Rongzi Shan | Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease Department of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

A Macroergonomic Framework to Understand Team Cognition in Care Transitions

Presenter: Abigail R. Wooldridge | Department of Industrial and Enterprise Systems Engineering, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign

SpineCloud: Data-Intensive Predictive Modeling of Spine Surgery Outcomes

Presenter: Tharindu De Silva | Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University

A Natural Language Powered Platform for Post-Operative Care: A Healthcare “Concierge”

Presenter: Ramavarapu “RS” Sreenivas | Department of Industrial and Enterprise Systems Engineering, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign

Why is Intraoperative Skill Assessment so Difficult? Identifying the Gap between Benchtop and OR Data

Presenter: Molly O'Brien | Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare, Johns Hopkins University

Unsupervised Learning for Surgical Motion by Learning to Predict the Future

Presenter: Robert DiPietro | Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare, Johns Hopkins University

SpineCloud: Data-Intensive Predictive Modeling of Spine Surgery Outcomes

Presenter: T. De Silva | Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University