The Johns Hopkins Research Symposium on

Engineering in Healthcare

"Engineering Innovation for Clinical Impact"

ABOUT THE SYMPOSIUM

The Annual Johns Hopkins Symposium on Healthcare brings together experts in biomedical engineering, mechanical engineering, computer science, and health care who advocate for leveraging new and emerging technologies to deliver better health care. We welcome faculty, students, and researchers, as well as those from the medical community and industry to join us at the symposium this fall.

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November 21, 2016

William H. Welch Medical Library

Johns Hopkins Medical Campus
Baltimore, MD

Schedule & Speakers

Presenters

Gregory D. Hager

room:Malone Hall 340

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Director

Gregory D. Hager

Director, Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare

Mandell Bellmore Professor of Computer Science

Research Interests

Computer Vision, Robotics, Medical Robotics, Human-Machine Systems

Gregory D. Hager is the Mandell Bellmore Professor of Computer Science at Johns Hopkins University and Founding Director of the Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare. Professor Hager received his BA in Mathematics and Computer Science Summa Cum Laude at Luther College (1983), and his MS (1986) and PhD (1988) from the University of Pennsylvania. He was a Fulbright Fellow at the University of Karlsruhe, and was on the faculty of Yale University prior to joining Johns Hopkins. Professor Hager’s research interests include collaborative and vision-based robotics, time-series analysis of image data, and medical applications of image analysis and robotics. He is also the former Chair of the Computing Community Consortium, a board member of the Computing Research Association, and is a member of the governing board of the International Federation of Robotics Research. Professor Hager has served on the editorial boards of IEEE TRO, IEEE PAMI, and IJCV. He is a fellow of the IEEE for his contributions to Vision-Based Robotics and a Fellow of the MICCAI Society for his contributions to imaging and his work on the analysis of surgical technical skill.

Secondary Appointments: Mechanical Engineering, Electrical & Computer Engineering

Artur Dubrawski

Artur Dubrawski

Artur Dubrawski researches useful intelligent systems and the ways to effectively build and deploy them. His work is driven by real-world applications, currently in the areas of public health, food safety, health informatics, clinical medicine, nuclear safety, intelligence and law enforcement, health of equipment, and predictive maintenance. It involves investigating machine learning algorithms to facilitate probabilistic modeling, predictive analysis, interactive exploration, and understanding of complex hypothesis spaces. Artur Dubrawski is a senior faculty at the Carnegie Mellon University Robotics Institute, where he directs the Auton Lab, a machine learning research group of 45. He also regularly teaches graduate and executive courses on data science.

Marilyn Hravnak

Marilyn Hravnak

Marilyn Hravnak is a tenured professor in the School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, where she is the Director of the PhD Program. She is actively involved in two NIH funded research projects. The first project “Predicting Instability Noninvasively for Nursing Care” uses machine learning and complexity modeling to nowcast and forecast impending cardiorespiratory instability in monitored patients on hospital wards and stepdown units, in order to identify such patients in advance and apply preemptive interventions. The second project “Developing Goal Directed Therapy for Neurocardiac Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (SAH)” identifies physiologic indicators of impaired systemic and cerebral perfusion in SAH patients, and the development of goal directed therapies to foster good functional and neurophysiologic outcomes. She is a fellow in the American College of Critical Care Medicine, as well as the American Academy of Nursing. She is also certified as an Adult Acute Care Nurse Practitioner.

Katherine Heller

Katherine Heller

Katherine Heller is an Assistant Professor in Statistical Science at Duke University. She is the recent recipient of a Google faculty research award, a first round BRAIN initiative award from the NSF, as well as a CAREER award. She received her PhD from the Gatsby Computational Neuroscience Unit at UCL, and was a postdoc at the University of Cambridge on an EPSRC postdoc fellowship, and at MIT on an NSF postdoc fellowship.

Lee Hartsell

Lee Hartsell

Lee Hartsell is an Assistant Professor in Neurology at Duke University School of Medicine, specializing in multiple sclerosis. He received his MD from the University of North Carolina at Chapel, where he also completed his neurology residency and MS fellowship. He is the Director of Connected Health at Duke’s DREAMS Center and a recent recipient of the Duke ENABLE grant.

Dr. Chatterjee

Dr. Chatterjee

Dr. Chatterjee is a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor at the Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health and Department of Oncology School of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University. Prior to joining Johns Hopkins, he led the Biostatistics Branch of the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics of the US National Cancer Institute during 2008-2015. He is known for foundational and methodological contributions to multiple areas of modern biomedical data science including large scale analysis of genetic association and gene-environment interactions in high throughout studies of genetic epidemiology and predictive model building by synthesis of information using disparate data sources. He has extensively collaborated in modern genome-wide association studies that have contributed to understanding genetic architecture and role of gene-environment interaction in the etiology underlying a variety of cancers. He has received numerous prestigious national and international awards, including the notable COPSS President Award (2011) that is sponsored by five major international statistical societies to recognize the outstanding contribution of a statistician under age 41.

Brian Denton

Brian Denton

Brian Denton is a Professor in the Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering at University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor, MI. He also holds an appointment in the Department of Urology at University of Michigan. Previously he has been an Associate Professor in the Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering at NC State University, a Senior Associate Consultant at Mayo Clinic, and a Senior Engineer at IBM. He is past president of the INFORMS Health Applications Section and he serves as Secretary on the INFORMS Board of Directors. He is currently President-Elect of INFORMS. His primary research interests are in simulation, stochastic models, and optimization of decision making under uncertainty with applications to chronic diseases including cancer and cardiovascular disease. He completed his Ph.D. in Management Science at McMaster University, his M.Sc. in Physics at York University, and his B.Sc. in Chemistry and Physics at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Rollin J “Terry” Fairbanks

Rollin J “Terry” Fairbanks

Rollin J “Terry” Fairbanks is the Director of the National Center for Human Factors in Healthcare, and Associate Director of the MedStar Institute for Innovation, where he is responsible for innovation in safety and learning. Dr. Fairbanks holds academic appointments as Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at Georgetown University and Adjunct Associate Professor of Industrial Systems Engineering at the University at Buffalo, and is an attending emergency physician at the MedStar Washington Hospital Center in Washington, DC. He holds a master’s degree in human factors/industrial systems engineering from Virginia Tech, and is a board certified emergency physician, private pilot, and former paramedic and EMS Medical Director, who uses his background in human factors engineering/industrial systems engineering to apply the science of safety to medical systems. He serves on the National Patient Safety Foundation Board of Governors, Emergency Medicine Patient Safety Foundation Board of Directors, and as a Health Research and Educational Trust (HRET) Senior Fellow. Dr. Fairbanks’ work is funded by several US Health and Human Services agencies, including the NIH, AHRQ, ONC, and several foundations. He has authored more than 120 publications on healthcare safety and human factors.

Scott Levin

Scott Levin

Scott Levin is an Associate Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine and holds joint appointments in the Department Civil Engineering (Whiting School of Engineering). He also works as a member of the Department of Operations Integration to forward operational, quality, and financial improvement initiatives within the Johns Hopkins Health System. He is Director and Leadership Council Chair of the Systems Institute. Upon finishing his Ph.D. in biomedical engineering at Vanderbilt University, Dr. Levin joined the Hopkins faculty in 2008. Dr. Levin’s research focuses on the use and development of systems engineering tools to study and improve the effectiveness, safety and efficiency of health care delivery. Research is directed toward determining how scarce health care resources may be managed and deployed to best care for patient populations. This includes an emphasis on systems engineering techniques aimed at improving quality of care, access to care, and medical decision-making.

Peter Pronovost

Peter Pronovost

Director, Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality

Research Interests

Patient safety; Evidence-based medicine; Quality health care; ICU care

Dr. Peter Pronovost is a world-renowned patient safety champion and a practicing critical care physician. His scientific work leveraging checklists to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections has saved thousands of lives and earned him high-profile accolades, including being named one of the 100 most influential people in the world by Time Magazine and receiving a coveted MacArthur Foundation “genius grant” in 2008. Elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2011, Dr. Pronovost is an advisor to the World Health Organizations’ World Alliance for Patient Safety and regularly addresses the U.S. Congress on patient safety issues. He is senior vice president of patient safety and quality and director of the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality at Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Dr. Pronovost, who earned his M.D. at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and his Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, is a practicing critical care physician and a professor in the departments of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Surgery, and Health Policy and Management. He previously headed the Johns Hopkins Quality and Safety Research Group and was medical director of the Hopkins Center for Innovation in Quality Patient Care.

Simon DiMaio

Simon DiMaio

Simon DiMaio leads Research and Advanced Product Development projects at Intuitive Surgical, Inc. (Sunnyvale, California), makers of the da Vinci Surgical System – a telerobotic system for minimally-invasive surgery. Simon holds a Ph.D. in robotics and control systems from the University of British Columbia, Canada, where he explored haptics and teleoperation technologies, and then went on to develop some of the very first needle insertion models and novel robotic needle steering methods for medical applications. Prior to moving to Intuitive Surgical, he completed a postdoctoral fellowship and later held an appointment as Instructor of Radiology at the Harvard Medical School, as a member of the Surgical Planning Laboratory (SPL) at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. At the SPL, he developed systems for MRI-compatible medical robots, as well as methods for navigated endoscopy and interventional guidance. In addition to R&D projects at Intuitive, Simon is involved in the development of academic relationships and programs, as well as the exploration of future platforms and applications of robotics and technology in medicine.

Thomas M. Krummel

Thomas M. Krummel

Thomas M. Krummel has served in leadership positions in many of the important surgical societies including the American College of Surgeons, the American Surgical Association, the American Board of Surgery, the American Board of Plastic Surgery, and was the President of the American Pediatric Surgical Association for 2013-2014. Dr. Krummel has lectured throughout the world, is author or co-author of over 300 publications, chapters, abstracts and books and he has mentored over 200 students, residents and post docs. Over the last 20 years, Dr. Krummel has been a pioneer in the application of information technology to simulation-based surgical training and surgical robotics. For more than 15 years, he has partnered with Dr. Paul Yock to co-direct the Stanford Biodesign program. He has served on numerous Scientific Advisory Boards and on the Boards of Directors of multiple successful medtech device start-ups and is Chairman of the Fogarty Institute for Innovation Board of Directors and President of the International Scientific Committee at IRCAD, University of Strasbourg, France.

Nabil Simaan

Nabil Simaan

Nabil Simaan received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, in 2002. His graduate advisor was Dr. Moshe Shoham. In 2003, he was a Postdoctoral Research Scientist at Johns Hopkins University National Science Foundation (NSF) Engineering Research Center for Computer-Integrated Surgical Systems and Technology (ERC-CISST), where he focused on minimally invasive robotic assistance in confined spaces under the supervision of Dr. Russell H. Taylor. In 2005, he joined Columbia University, New York, NY, as an Assistant Professor of mechanical engineering and the Director of the Advanced Robotics and Mechanisms Applications (ARMA) Laboratory. In 2009 he received the NSF Career award for young investigators to design new algorithms and robots for safe interaction with the anatomy. In 2010 he joined Vanderbilt University as an associate professor of mechanical engineering. He currently holds secondary appointments in Computer Science and in Otolaryngology. He is a Senior Member of the IEEE. He served as an Editor for IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) (2013-2015), Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Robotics (TRO) (2012-2016), Editorial board member of Robotica, Area Chair for Robotics Science and Systems (2014, 2015) and Corresponding Co-Chair for the IEEE Technical Committee on Surgical Robotics.

Jeffrey H. Siewerdsen – Asst Prof
Jeffrey H. Siewerdsen

Jeffrey H. Siewerdsen – Asst Prof

Jeffrey H. Siewerdsen is a professor in Johns Hopkins University’s Department of Biomedical Engineering and holds joint appointments in the Department of Computer Science at the Whiting School of Engineering, as well as in the Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and in the Department of Neurosurgery at the School of Medicine. As vice chair for clinical and industry translation in the Department Biomedical Engineering, Dr. Siewerdsen facilitates new and expanded opportunities for clinical collaboration, translational research, and industry partnerships. He also founded the I-STAR Lab and co-directs the Carnegie Center for Surgical Innovation, each providing a home base at the Medical Campus for collaboration among engineers and clinical experts.

Since joining Johns Hopkins University in 2009, Dr. Siewerdsen has led a growing program for translational research in medical imaging and image-guided interventions. His primary research interests involve the physics of image quality and the development of new imaging technologies, with a focus on cone-beam CT for improved diagnostic accuracy and high-precision intervention. His main sources of inspiration – apart from his students – are his clinical collaborators, including key partnerships with neurosurgery, orthopaedic surgery, otolaryngology, radiation oncology, interventional radiology, and diagnostic radiology. He loves Hopkins Hospital, which he affectionately refers to as the “Red- Brick Schoolhouse” or the “Challenge Factory” – and engineers love a challenge. Among his accomplishments are the early development of flat-panel x-ray detectors and his pioneering work in cone-beam CT for image-guided surgery, image-guided radiation therapy, and diagnostic radiology – where in several cases, his work has come to represent the standard of care.

Dr. Siewerdsen earned his PhD in Physics from the University of Michigan in 1998. Before joining Johns Hopkins University, he was a research scientist at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Michigan, and an associate professor and senior scientist at the Ontario Cancer Institute and University of Toronto.

 See Installment Ceremony Program

Mehran Armand

Mehran Armand

Mehran Armand is a member of principal staff at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) and holds joint appointments in the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Orthopaedic Surgery. At JHU/APL he is currently the principal investigator of programs in robotics, clinical biomechanics, and computer-integrated surgery. Dr. Armand currently directs the collaborative Laboratory for Biomechanical- and Image-Guided Surgical Systems (BIGSS) within the Center Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics (LCSR) at JHU/Whiting school of engineering. He also co-directs of the newly established AVICENNA center for advancing surgical technologies, located at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. His lab encompasses research in continuum manipulators, biomechanics, medical image analysis for translation to clinical application of integrated surgical systems in the areas of orthopaedic, ENT, and craniofacial reconstructive surgery.

Bilge Mutlu

Bilge Mutlu

Bilge Mutlu is an Associate Professor of Computer Science, Psychology, and Industrial Engineering at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He directs the Wisconsin HCI Laboratory and organizes the WHCI+D Group. His research program builds human-centered methods and principles for designing robotic technologies that help people communicate, work, and pursue personal goals and draws on a transdisciplinary design research process that combines aspects of design, computer science, and social and cognitive sciences.
Dr. Mutlu collaborates closely with Leila Takayama, Terry Fong, Lyn Turkstra, Melissa Duff, Julie Shah, Michael Gleicher, and John Lee and receives support from NSF, NIH, NASA, Google, and Toyota.

Andrea Grimes Parker

Andrea Grimes Parker

Andrea Grimes Parker is an Assistant Professor at Northeastern University, with joint appointments in the College of Computer & Information Science and the Bouvé College of Health Sciences. She holds a Ph.D. in Human-Centered Computing from Georgia Tech and a B.S. in Computer Science from Northeastern University.

Dr. Parker is the director of the Wellness Technology Lab at Northeastern University. This interdisciplinary research group spans the domains of human-computer interaction (HCI), personal health informatics, and public health to examine how social and ubiquitous computing systems can help reduce ethnic, racial and socio-economic health disparities. Much of her research has focused on the design of interactive systems that help neighborhoods care for themselves, and systems that encourage adolescent and family-based behavior change.

Dr. Parker’s research has yielded best paper nominations at the premiere HCI conferences and she has served on technical program committees for the Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM) top HCI conferences, including CHI, CSCW and Ubicomp. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the Aetna Foundation. Dr. Parker served as the National Evaluator for the Aetna Foundation’s portfolio of projects on mobile health interventions in community settings and Co-Chair of CHI 2016 Late-Breaking Work. She is currently Technical Program Committee Co-Chair for PervasiveHealth 2017.

Omar Ahmad

room :Carnegie 212

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Omar Ahmad

Director of Innovative Engineering, Department of Neurology

Director, Kata, Department of Neurology

Research Interests

Physics Driven Animation, Neuro-motor Rehabilitation Using Interactive Experiences, Virtual and Augmented Reality for Medicine

Omar Ahmad, Ph.D. is the Director of Innovative Engineering in the Department of Neurology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and also the Director and Chief Creative Engineer of the Kata design group in the Department of Neurology. He is responsible for Kata’s creative output and all Kata personnel. His strategic vision focuses on four fundamental aspects:

  1. Fostering the best entertainment content possible through artistic/emotional mastery, scientific research, and creative technological innovation
  2. Creating visceral user experiences based upon neuroscience and physics based animations for engendering movements beneficial for motor recovery and brain repair
  3. Overall vision for all Kata products, bridging the gap between academia and commercial-quality engineering
  4. Applying the creative output of Kata to medical therapeutics on the clinical floor and iterating through design with physicians and clinical staff

Dr. Ahmad is the inventor of a number of physics-based real-time technologies and algorithms to create visceral user experiences that engender specific movements for greater brain plasticity after brain injury. He is responsible for maintaining tangible product output for KATA, so that it exceeds, in quality and innovation, what would be expected from academic or commercial production in isolation.

He received his BS, MSE, and PhD degrees in Computer Science, from the Johns Hopkins University, GWC Whiting School of Engineering.

Programs

  • Registration

  • Introductory Session: Welcoming Remarks

    Moderators

    T.E. Schlesinger, Benjamin T. Rome Dean, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University

    Michael J. Klag, Dean, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University

  • Introductory Session: Welcoming Remarks

    Abstract

    How can engineering innovation impact healthcare, and how can we accelerate it? I will outline our vision for engineering research-based innovation, which unites systems modeling and evidence-driven decision support with user-centered design of technology innovations, and its potential for long-term value improvement in healthcare.

    Moderators

    Gregory D. Hager, Director, Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare, Mandell Bellmore Professor, Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University

  • Panel 1: Novel Frameworks for Driving Decisions Using Data

    Moderators

    Suchi Saria, Assistant Professor, Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University

    Brian S. Caffo, Professor, Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University

    Panelists

    Artur Dubrawski, Director, Auton Lab, Carnegie Mellon University

    Marilyn Hravnak, Professor and PhD Director, School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh

    Katherine Heller, Assistant Professor, Department of Statistical Science, Duke University

    Lee Hartsell, Assistant Professor, Department of Neurology, Duke University

    Nilanjan Chatterjee, Bloomberg Distinguished Professor, Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University

  • Break

  • Panel 2: Systems Engineering Approaches to Improved Care Delivery

    Moderators

    Sauleh Siddiqui, Assistant Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Johns Hopkins University

    Panelists

    Brian Denton, Professor, Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering and Department of Urology, University of Michigan

    Rollin J. "Terry" Fairbanks, Director of the National Center for Human Factors in Healthcare, Associate Director, MedStar Institute for Innovation

    Scott Levin, Associate Professor, Assistant Director for Research, Department of Emergency Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

  • Remarks & Introduction

    Antony Rosen, Vice Dean for Research, Professor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

  • Engineering in Healthcare: Pathways to Clinical Impact

    Peter Pronovost, Senior Vice President for Patient Safety and Quality, Director of The Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, Johns Hopkins Medicine

  • Lunch

  • Remarks & Introduction

    Gregory D. Hager, Director, Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare, Mandell Bellmore Professor, Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University

  • Engineering in Healthcare: An Industry Perspective

    Simon DiMaio, Senior Manager, Research and Advanced Systems Development, Intuitive Surgical, Inc.

  • Panel 3: Engineering Innovations for Interventional Medicine

    Moderators

    Russell H. Taylor, John C. Malone Professor of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University

    Panelists

    Thomas M. Krummel Emile Holman Professor and Chair Emeritus, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine Susan B. Ford Surgeon-in-Chief, Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford, Co-Director, Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign

    Nabil Simaan, Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Associate Professor of Otolaryngology, Vanderbilt University

    Jeffrey H. Siewerdsen, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Director of the Carnegie Center for Surgical Innovation, Johns Hopkins University

    Mehran Armand, Associate Research Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Senior Scientist, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University

  • Break

  • Panel 4: Patient-Centered Design Engineering

    Moderators

    John Krakauer, Director, the Center for the Study of Motor Learning and Brain Repair, Professor, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University

    Panelists

    Bilge Mutlu, Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Andrea Grimes Parker, Assistant Professor, College of Computer and Information Science, Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University

    Omar Ahmad, Director of Innovative Engineering, Department of Neurology, Director Kata, Johns Hopkins University

  • Closing Remarks

    Landon Stuart King, Executive Vice Dean, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

  • Receptions and Poster Presentations

Poster Presentations

Galen Surgical System

Presenter: Yunus Sevimli, Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics

Machine Learning for Clinical Decision Support for Heart Failure Readmission

Presenter: Wei Jiang, Civil Engineering

Pediatric Trauma Care Transitions: Understanding Teamwork for Health IT Design

Presenter: Nicolette McGeorge, Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality

Human Factors Approach to Disseminating an Intervention for Improving Blood Culture Utilization

Presenter: Anping Xie, Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality

ModPro Stethoscope: Programmable Electronic Stethoscope for Improved Auscultation Analysis

Presenter: Ian McLane, Electrical and Computer Engineering

The Role of a Decision Tree Model

Presenter: Zhi Cheng, Radiation Oncology

Language of Surgery: Activity and Skill Recognition in Surgery

Presenter: Narges Ahmidi, Computer Science

Relation Between Physical Performance and Accelerometry-Derived Walking Features of Elderly Adults

Presenter: Jacek Urbanek, Biostatistics

Acetabular Fragment Pose Estimation for Pelvic Osteotomies with Intra-Operative 2D X-Ray Imaging

Presenter: Robert Grupp, Computer Science

Robot-Assisted Active Learning of Surgical Technical Skill

Presenter: Swaroop Vedula, Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare

Enhanced Endoscopic Navigation for Sinus Surgery

Presenter: Ayushi Sinha, Computer Science

Integration of Real-Time Photoacoustic Image Guidance with the da Vinci Surgical System

Presenter: Muyinatu Bell, Electrical Engineering

Mathematical models for scheduling patients and healthcare providers

Presenter: Anton Dahbura, Computer Science

A Johns Hopkins Corrie Smartphone Application for Heart Attack Recovery

Presenter: Erin Spaulding, Nursing