The Johns Hopkins Research Symposium on

Engineering in Healthcare

"Teaming With Technology Along the Care Spectrum"

ABOUT THE SYMPOSIUM

The annual Johns Hopkins Research Symposium on Engineering in Healthcare brings together experts who advocate for leveraging new and emerging technologies to deliver better health care. We invite all Johns Hopkins faculty, researchers, students, staff and clinicians, as well as industry representatives, to join us at the symposium this fall.

 

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Schedule & Speakers

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November 20, 2017

Chevy Chase Auditorium

Johns Hopkins Medical Campus
Baltimore, MD

Schedule & Speakers

Presenters

Gina Lynn Adrales

Gina Lynn Adrales

Director, Division of Minimally Invasive Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital

Gina Adrales, M.D., M.P.H., joins the Johns Hopkins Department of Surgery as Director of the Division of Minimally Invasive Surgery, Director of the Minimally Invasive Surgery Training and Innovation Center, and Co-Director of the Johns Hopkins Bariatric Surgery Fellowship. Her areas of clinical expertise include gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gallbladder disease, achalasia, splenectomy (spleen removal), benign gastric and intestinal surgery, bariatric surgery, and open and laparoscopic hernia repair (inguinal, ventral, incisional, umbilical, hiatal, paraesophageal).

Prior to joining Johns Hopkins, Dr. Adrales was on faculty at Dartmouth where she directed the Surgery Clerkship, the Hernia Surgery Center, and the Bariatric Surgery Program.  During her tenure at Dartmouth, she earned her Masters of Public Health at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice. She received her undergraduate degree from the College of William and Mary and her medical degree from the University of Virginia. She completed her residency at the Carolinas Medical Center and a research and clinical fellowship in minimally invasive surgery at the University of Kentucky before her first faculty appointment at the Medical College of Georgia.

A national leader in hernia surgery, Dr. Adrales serves on the Executive Council of the Americas Hernia Society and previously served on the Executive Council of the Americas Hernia Society Quality Collaborative to improve the safety and quality of hernia surgery. She is actively involved in a number of committees for the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons including various roles in surgical education, the development of the Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery and an innovative interactive hernia surgery education module.

Dr. Adrales’ research interests include health services research, clinical outcomes and quality improvement in minimally invasive foregut surgery, bariatric and metabolic surgery, and abdominal wall reconstruction. She has presented her work regionally, nationally, and internationally.

Peter A. Calabresi

Peter A. Calabresi

Director, Johns Hopkins Multiple Sclerosis Center, Johns Hopkins & Professor of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Peter A. Calabresi, MD is a Professor of Neurology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Director of the Johns Hopkins Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Center. Dr. Calabresi is also Director of the Division of Neuroimmunology and Neuroinfectious Diseases. He earned his undergraduate degree from Yale College and medical degree from Brown University. Dr. Calabresi completed a research fellowship at the National Institutes of Health, Neuroimmunology Branch.

As director of the Division of neuroimmunology and the MS Center at Johns Hopkins, Dr. Calabresi is the principal investigator on several translational research projects examining the utility of imaging and blood biomarkers. His specific laboratory research interest lies in understanding the mechanisms by which effector memory T cells interface with glial cells in the brain to mediate neurodegeneration. Dr. Calabresi has published over 280 research papers including numerous articles on imaging and the immunopathogenesis of MS. He is the recipient of a Jacob Javits Neuroscience Investigator award from the National Institutes of Health, and was awarded the Barancik prize for innovation in MS research.

Sara J. Czaja

Sara J. Czaja

Leonard M. Miller Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences & Director, Center on Aging, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Sara J. Czaja is a Leonard M. Miller Professor of the Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and has secondary appointments in Industrial Engineering, Psychology and Neurology at the University of Miami. She is also the Director of the Center on Aging at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and the Director of the Center on Research and Education for Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE).  CREATE funded by the National Institute on Aging, focuses on older adults and technology systems. Dr. Czaja research interests include: aging and cognition, aging and technology systems, family caregiving, older workers, training, and functional assessment. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA), the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and the Gerontological Society of America.

Pierre E. Dupont

Pierre E. Dupont

Chief of Pediatric Cardiac Bioengineering, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School

Pierre E. Dupont is Chief of Pediatric Cardiac Bioengineering and holder of the Edward P. Marram Chair at Boston Children’s Hospital. His research group develops robotic instrumentation and imaging technology for medical applications. He received the BS, MS and PhD degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA. After graduation, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA. He subsequently moved to Boston University, Boston, MA, USA where he was a Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering. He is an IEEE Fellow and his group has received a number of paper awards including the King-Sun Fu Best Paper Award of the IEEE Transactions on Robotics in 2010, the IEEE ICRA Best Medical Robotics Paper Award in 2012 and the IEEE/RSJ IROS Best Paper Award in 2014. He is a Senior Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Robotics and is on the Advisory Board of Science Robotics.

Ayse P. Gurses

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Ayse P. Gurses

Associate Professor, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine

Director, Center for Health Care Human Factors, Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality

Research Interests

Human Factors Engineering, Cognitive Engineering, User-centered Design, Patient Safety, Sociotechnical Systems Approach to Technology Design and Implementation, Care Coordination

Ayse P. Gurses, PhD, MS, MPH is an associate professor in the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality and the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. She is the founding Director of the Center for Health Care Human Factors in the Johns Hopkins Medicine. She has joint appointments in the Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Whiting School of Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. Ayse is passionate about three critical and related public health topics: patient safety, health IT design and implementation, and occupational health and safety of healthcare workers. Formally trained in industrial and systems engineering and public health, she uses a combination of engineering and public health methodologies in her work. Ayse has been a principal or co-principal investigator on several federally funded research grants and contracts, totaling over $7M. Her current research efforts focus on improving patient-centered care and medication safety among elderly, health information technology design and implementation, improving coordination and teamwork in pediatric trauma, patient safety in the cardiac operating room, improving safety of transitions of care, increasing compliance with evidence-based guidelines to reduce infections, and clinician working conditions.

Ayse is the author of 50 peer-reviewed articles and 10 book chapters, and gave over 65 invited talks. She serves as the Scientific Editor of Applied Ergonomics, a top-level journal in the field of human factors engineering. She is also the Editor for the Sociotechnical Systems Analysis Department of the IIE Transactions in Healthcare Systems Engineering.

Ayse is the recipient of multiple awards including the Liberty Mutual Award for the Best Paper in the journal ‘Ergonomics,’ the International Ergonomics Association/ Liberty Mutual Best Paper Award in Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison Forward under 40 award. Nominated by the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, Ayse is also a recipient of an Early Career Impact Award from the Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences (FABBS).

Gregory D. Hager

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Director

Gregory D. Hager

Director, Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare

Mandell Bellmore Professor of Computer Science

Research Interests

Computer Vision, Robotics, Medical Robotics, Human-Machine Systems

Gregory D. Hager is the Mandell Bellmore Professor of Computer Science at Johns Hopkins University and Founding Director of the Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare. Professor Hager received his BA in Mathematics and Computer Science Summa Cum Laude at Luther College (1983), and his MS (1986) and PhD (1988) from the University of Pennsylvania. He was a Fulbright Fellow at the University of Karlsruhe, and was on the faculty of Yale University prior to joining Johns Hopkins. Professor Hager’s research interests include collaborative and vision-based robotics, time-series analysis of image data, and medical applications of image analysis and robotics. He is also the former Chair of the Computing Community Consortium, a board member of the Computing Research Association, and is a member of the governing board of the International Federation of Robotics Research. Professor Hager has served on the editorial boards of IEEE TRO, IEEE PAMI, and IJCV. He is a fellow of the IEEE for his contributions to Vision-Based Robotics and a Fellow of the MICCAI Society for his contributions to imaging and his work on the analysis of surgical technical skill.

Secondary Appointments: Mechanical Engineering, Electrical & Computer Engineering

David E. Newman-Toker

David E. Newman-Toker

Director, Division of Neuro-Visual & Vestibular Disorders, Department of Neurology

Professor of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

David E. Newman-Toker, MD PhD is an internationally-recognized leader in neuro-otology, acute stroke diagnosis, and the study of diagnostic errors. He is Professor of Neurology, Otolaryngology, and Ophthalmology, with joint appointments in Emergency Medicine, Acute Care Nursing, Health Sciences Informatics, Epidemiology, and Health Policy at the Johns Hopkins University Schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health. He serves as Director of the Division of Neuro-Visual & Vestibular Disorders in Neurology and as Director of the Armstrong Institute Center for Diagnostic Excellence that seeks to catalyze efforts to improve diagnostic performance, develop the science of diagnostic safety, and enhance diagnostic research.

Casey Overby Taylor

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Casey Overby Taylor

Assistant Professor Divisions of, General Internal Medicine and Health Sciences Informatics in the Department of Medicine

Research Interests

translational bioinformatics, human-centered technology design research, clinical decision support, knowledge-based methods

Dr. Casey Overby Taylor is Assistant Professor in the Divisions of General Internal Medicine and Health Sciences Informatics in the Department of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University. She completed pre-doctoral National Library of Medicine biomedical informatics training and National Human Genome Research Institute genome sciences training fellowships at the University of Washington. She also completed a post-doctoral National Library of Medicine informatics training fellowship at Columbia University. As an informatics researcher, Dr. Taylor’s interests intersect at public health genomics and biomedical informatics. She is currently developing applications that support translation of genomic research to clinical and population-based healthcare settings and delivering health information and knowledge to the public. Dr. Taylor is also developing knowledge-based approaches to use Big Data such as electronic health record data for population health.

Kenneth J. Pienta

Kenneth J. Pienta

Director of Research, Brady Urological Institute of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine & Donald S. Coffey Professor of Urology 

Kenneth J. Pienta is the Donald S. Coffey Professor of Urology and serves as the Director of Research at the Brady Urological Institute of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  He is also a Professor in the Departments of Oncology and Pharmacology and Molecular Science and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

Currently, Dr. Pienta is involved in research to define the tumor microenvironment of prostate cancer metastases, as well as developing new therapies for prostate cancer. He is the author of more than 400 peer-reviewed articles, and been the principal investigator on numerous local and national clinical trials. Throughout his career, Dr. Pienta has effectively mentored more than 50 students, residents, and fellows to successful careers in medicine and science.

Shawna J. Perry

Shawna J. Perry

Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine – Jacksonville

Shawna J. Perry MD, FACEP is Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at University of Florida Health Science Center in Jacksonville, FL and an Honorary Associate Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, College of Engineering, Center for Quality & Productivity Improvement. She spent  6 years as the Director for Patient Safety System Engineering at Virginia Commonwealth University Health Systems in Richmond, VA and Associate Professor/Associate Chair for the Department of Emergency Medicine. For 12 years, she was Director of Clinical Operations, Chief of Service and Associate Chair of Emergency Medicine at University of Florida Health Sciences Center in Jacksonville, FL where she provided leadership and management for numerous departmental, hospital and university-based initiatives related to large scale coordination of clinical work, to the implementation of new information technology (IT) systems into the clinical setting. Since 1996, Dr. Perry’s primary research interest has been in patient safety, with a particular interest in human factors and ergonomics, the nature of system failures, transitions in care, the impact of IT impact clinical work, organizational behavior and teamwork. She is widely published on topics related to patient safety, human factors and ergonomics, naturalistic decision-making, resilience in healthcare, and emergency medicine. Dr. Perry is a graduate of Stanford University in Stanford, CA and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine  in Cleveland, OH.

Wanda Pratt

Wanda Pratt

Professor, Information School and adjunct in Biomedical & Health Informatics, University of Washington

Dr. Wanda Pratt is a Professor in the Information School and adjunct in Biomedical & Health Informatics at the University of Washington. She received her Ph.D. in Medical Informatics from Stanford University, and her M.S. in Computer Science from the University of Texas. Her research focuses on understanding patients’ needs and designing new technologies to address those needs. Dr. Pratt has received best paper awards from AMIA, the ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI), the ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), and the Journal of the American Society of Information Science & Technology (JASIS&T). Her research has been funded by NSF, NLM, AHRQ, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Intel, and Microsoft. Dr. Pratt is a fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics; she is on the Board of Directors for AMIA, and Chaired their 2016 Annual Symposium.

Alan D. Ravitz

Alan D. Ravitz

‎Chief Engineer National Health Mission Area, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory 

Alan Ravitz, Professional Staff member at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), is the Chief Engineer for APL’s National Health Mission Area. In this capacity, Dr. Ravitz  oversees technical aspects of a range of projects spanning biomedical and healthcare topics including neural prosthetics, precision medicine, systems biology, biomaterials, patient safety, and systems engineering. Prior to involvement  in  these  areas,  he  supported  APL’s  undersea  warfare programs by developing signal and information processing technology for aircraft, surface ship, and submarine sonar and combat systems.

Dr. Ravitz is a Certified Systems Engineering Professional (CSEP) by The International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) and a licensed Professional Engineer (Maryland). He is also the Acting Program Chair for the Healthcare Systems Engineering Master’s degree program within the JHU Whiting School of Engineering, Engineering for Professionals program. Dr. Ravitz has degrees in Biomedical Engineering (BS), Electrical Engineering (MS), Technical Management (MS), and Systems Engineering (PhD).

Adam Sapirstein

Adam Sapirstein

Director, Division of Adult Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins Hospital

Dr. Adam Sapirstein is an associate professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine and an assistant professor of surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His area of clinical expertise is adult critical care. He is director of the Division of Adult Critical Care Medicine and is on faculty at the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality.

Dr. Sapirstein received his medical degree from Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine and completed a residency in anesthesiology at Massachusetts General Hospital. He also performed a fellowship in anesthesiology and critical care medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital.

His research focuses on the roles of phospholipases A2 and their lipid metabolites in brain injury.

He is a member of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Society for Neuroscience and the Society for Critical Care Medicine.

Jenna Wiens

Jenna Wiens

Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Michigan in Ann Arbor

Jenna Wiens is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Her primary research interests lie at the intersection of machine learning, data mining, and healthcare. She is particularly interested in time-series analysis and transfer/multitask learning. The overarching goal of her research agenda is to develop the computational methods needed to help organize, process, and transform patient data into actionable knowledge. Jenna received her PhD from MIT in 2014. In 2015, she was named Forbes 30 under 30 in Science and Healthcare; she received an NSF CAREER Award in 2016; and recently she was named to the MIT Tech Review’s list of Innovators Under 35.

Programs

  • Welcoming Remarks

    ED SCHLESINGER

    Benjamin T. Rome Dean, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University

    GREGORY D. HAGER

    Mandell Bellmore Professor of Computer Science, Director of The Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare, Johns Hopkins University

  • Keynote

    DR. SARA CJAZA

    Leonard M. Miller Professor, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

    "Maximizing the Benefits of Healthcare Technology for Consumers"

    Technology is playing an increasingly important role within the healthcare domain for service delivery, in-home monitoring, interactive communication between patients and providers, transfer of health information, and peer support. Given the movement towards the provision of care for chronic conditions in home settings consumers also have to interact with complex technologies in care management. Unfortunately, the potential benefits of technology are often unrecognized for many consumer groups such as older adults or underserved populations due to problems with access and usability. This presentation will focus on how a user-centered design process and a focus on users can enhance the meaningful access and use of healthcare technologies by diverse populations. An emphasis will be given to older adults given that they typically need and utilize healthcare services more so than other age groups. Examples, will also be presented from CREATE, a multi-site NIH funded Center, that focuses on older adults and interactions with technology systems.

  • Break

  • Technology Teaming with People

    Moderator

    SARA CZAJA

    Panelists

    SHAWNA PERRY

    Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Florida

    AYSE GURSES

    Director, Armstrong Institute Center for Health Care Human Factors

    WANDA PRATT

    Professor in the Information School and Adjunct Professor in Biomedical & Health Informatics, University of Washington

    CASEY OVERBY TAYLOR

    Assistant Professor, Division of General Internal Medicine with a joint position in the Division Health Sciences Informatics in the Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

  • Lightning Pitches

    Moderator

    SIMON MATHEWS

    Assistant Director, Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality at Johns Hopkins Bayview

    Presenters

    LILIANA STEFANIUK

    Practice Manager at Glen Burnie Medical Center

    AARON HSU

    CEO, ClearMask LLC

    JAMES BRASIC

    Assistant Professor, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

    MICHELLE COLDER CARRAS

    Postdoctoral Fellow, Psychiatric Epidemiology Training Program in the Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

    STEVEN KLINE

    Systems Engineer, Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering

  • Lunch

  • Augmenting People Through Technology

    Moderator

    JEREMY BROWN

    John C. Malone Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University

    Panelists

    GINA ADRALES

    ‎Director, Division of Minimally Invasive Surgery and Associate Professor of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University

    PIERRE DUPONT

    ‎Chief of Pediatric Cardiac Bioengineering and Edward P. Marram Chair at Boston Children’s Hospital

    JENNA WEINS

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor

    DAVID NEWMAN-TOKER

    Director, Division of Neuro-Visual & Vestibular Disorders, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University

  • Break

  • Institutional Workshop & Breakout Sessions: Achieving Precision and Value: The Role of People and Technology

    Moderator

    ANTONY ROSEN

    Panelists

    ADAM SAPIRSTEIN

    Director, Division of Adult Critical Care Medicine, Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

    ALAN RAVITZ

    Chief Engineer National Health Mission Area, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

    PETER CALABRESI

    Director, Division of Neuroimmunology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

    KEN PIENTA

    Donald S. Coffey Professor of Urology and Professor of Oncology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

  • Closing Remarks

    SUSANNAH PORTERFIELD

    Associate Vice Provost for Research, Johns Hopkins University

    GREGORY D. HAGER

    Mandell Bellmore Professor of Computer Science, Director of The Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare, Johns Hopkins University

  • Poster Session and Cocktails

    Arcade Room

Poster Presentations

Both Mirror and Complement: A Comparison of Social Media Data and Survey Data about Flu Vaccination

Presenter: Adrian Benton, Department of Computer Science, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University

Commercial video games as therapy: A new research agenda to unlock the potential of a global pastime

Presenter: Michelle Colder Carras, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Smart-Phone Application (MHi-GO) For Symptom Tracking and Medication Adherence in Mood Disorders

Presenter: Kara Glazer, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Bio-inspired Design of Nanoparticle Artificial Antigen-Presenting Cells for Immunotherapy

Presenter: J.W. Hickey, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University

Ontology-Based Natural Language Processing of Emergency Department Chief Complaints

Presenter: Christopher El Khuri, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Decentralized Personalized Medical Records

Presenter: Steven Kline, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University

Patient Safety Engineering Collaboration (PSC)

Presenter: Stacey Marks, Johns Hopkins Institute for Clinical Research & Translational Research

The Collective Dynamics of Unit-to-Unit Hospital Equipment Sharing

Presenter: Diego Martínez, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Skill Classification in Unstructured Septoplasty Data

Presenter: Molly O'Brien, The Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare

Using past data and a novel deformable registration paradigm to infer patient CT during endoscopic procedures

Presenter: Ayushi Sinha, The Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare

OneL: Cloud-based EHR System for LEP and International Patients

Presenter: Liliana Stefaniuk, Glen Burnie Medical Center

A Systematic Review of Online Health Searches and their Effects on Health Outcomes and Patient-Clinician Relationships

Presenter: Jane Wang, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine